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Bio

William Ellis is at the vanguard of music photographers and is widely recognised as having created an important document of the contemporary jazz scene in Africa, Europe and The Americas.
His contribution to the culture was recognised by the American Jazz Museum in Kansas City when he was invited to produce the Inaugural International Exhibition in 2005, and where he returned in 2008 to present his work alongside two of the most highly regarded photographers in the genre from Europe and the United States in ‘Jazz in Black and White': Bebop and Beyond.
Ellis’ work has been exhibited at international festivals and galleries in the U.K. and throughout the world including The Royal Academy of Arts London, Amsterdam, Bremen, Cape Town, Havana, The Hague, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, New York City, Orlando, Toronto and Utrecht.
Later this year he will exhibit and give a presentation on his work in association with the American Jazz Museum at the Hong Kong and Penang Island International Jazz Festivals respectively.
William Ellis serves on the committee of the Milt Hinton Award for Excellence in Jazz Photography along with his peers – Herman Leonard, one of the great genre definig jazz photographers.
His images have been used in the JAM (Jazz Appreciation Month) Outreach program in the United States initiated by the Smithsonian Institution and many of his pictures are in the private collections worldwide – including those of the musicians with whom he has worked.
The work continues, shooting front of house and backstage at the world’s legendary clubs and festivals.
William Ellis’ insightful portraits, telling performance  and exquisite still life images play their part in creating the visual heritage of today’s international music scene.
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William Ellis is at the vanguard of music photographers and is widely recognised as having created an important document of the contemporary jazz scene in Africa, Europe and The Americas.

His contribution to the culture was recognised by the American Jazz Museum in Kansas City when he was invited to produce the Inaugural International Exhibition in 2005, and where he returned in 2008 to present his work alongside two of the most highly regarded photographers in the genre from Europe and the United States in ‘Jazz in Black and White': Bebop and Beyond.

William’s fine art prints have been exhibited at international festivals and galleries extensively in the U.K. and throughout the world.

He was appointed Guest Visual Artist at Cork, Glasgow and Northsea Jazz Festivals respectively and the presentation of his permanent exhibition at the Jazz Café on the Malecón was the opening event at the 2009 Havana Plaza Jazz Festival.

His images have been used in the JAM (Jazz Appreciation Month) Outreach program in the United States initiated by the Smithsonian Institution and many of his pictures are in the private collections worldwide – including those of the musicians with whom he has worked.

The work continues, shooting front of house and backstage at the world’s legendary clubs and festivals, his insightful portraits, telling performance and exquisite still life images play their part in creating the visual heritage of today’s international music scene.

 

“One LP is a journey into another’s soul – because the recording each person choses to hold and talk about is a part of them: their past, present and future.”

“The One LP concept came about as a result of many conversations with musicians and a desire on my part to find a way of recording the narrative between the people I was speaking with about music they love. I feel this is a compelling insight into how this music often sets out the course of their lives. The project is ongoing and now encompasses those involved in many aspects of the arts.”

“A study of the artist portrayed with a favourite recording.
Each portrait is accompanied by a short interview that explores the album’s meaning and value for the subject.”

William Ellis

http://www.onelp.com/